GLOSSARY

INDEX

A

Aave token

The AAVE token is an Ethereum-based ERC-20 asset used as the governance token of the Aave blockchain protocol. AAVE token holders have the ability to propose changes and vote to approve or deny new proposals to the Aave protocol. With significant enough distribution, AAVE tokens are intended to eventually accommodate the autonomous and decentralized governance of the Aave platform.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Apy

Annual Percentage Yield, a time-based measurement of the Return On Investment (ROI) on an asset. For example, $100 invested at 2% APY would yield $102 after one year, if there is no compounding of any interest earned on that $100 through the year. Assuming a static APY rate, the Monthly ROI would be 0.16%, in this case.

Source: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

Arpanet

Advanced Research Projects Agency Network (APRANET) is an early version of the internet. ARPANET was created by the U.S. Department of Defense and used two technical foundations of the modern internet: a packet switching network with distributed control and TCP/IP.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Asic-resistant

An ASIC-resistant cryptocurrency has its protocol and mining algorithm configured in such a way that using ASIC machines to mine the coin is either impossible or brings no significant benefit when compared to traditional GPU mining.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Aave

Aave is an open-source and non-custodial lending protocol enabling the creation of money markets. Users can earn interest on deposits and also borrow assets. Aave provides depositors a Liquidity Token that represents an equivalent derivative deposit in an identical asset. For example, a user can deposit DAI and receive aDAI, which is a type of USD-based crypto derivative that essentially represents the value of the underlying DAI asset plus the interest gains from allowing the borrowing of one's DAI. That aDAI, could then also be used to implement further strategies to potentially amplify their gains even further.

Source: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

2

Aave is a decentralized lending and borrowing platform on Ethereum. Aave users can take out loans by providing collateral in the form of crypto assets. Lenders who provide collateral to Aave receive aTokens in return, which automatically pay interest to the holder with funds earned from platform trading fees. Aave has pioneered the technology of ‘flash loans,’ which allow for the uncollateralized lending of funds, so long as the principal is repaid within the same Ethereum transaction block.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Absolute advantage

An economics concept in which one party has a direct advantage in efficiency in producing/providing a specific good or service over another party.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Account

Account is a synonym for the usual term wallet and can be described as a private account owned by a Monero user.

An account contains all of the Monero transactions that have been sent and received. The account balance is a sum of all the XMR received, less the XMR sent. Every Monero account has two balances: a locked and an unlocked. The unlocked balance contains funds that can be spent immediately, and the locked balance contains funds that can not be spent at the moment. You may receive a transaction that has an unlock time set, or you may have sent some Monero and are waiting for the change to come back to your wallet, both situations that could lead to those funds being locked for a time.

A key difference between traditional electronic currency and Monero is that your account resides only under your control, normally on your computer, and cannot be accessed by anyone else if you practice good security.

Source: https://monero.org/monero-glossary/account/

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

Account abstraction layer (aal)

The Account Abstraction Layer (AAL) is the technical infrastructure that makes smart contract development possible on the Qtum blockchain. The foundational layer of Qtum follows the UTXO model used on blockchains such as Bitcoin. The AAL on Qtum allows the accounts model used on Ethereum to be “abstracted” or transferred in order to work on top of the UTXO model. Qtum’s AAL is the computing go-between that allows the UTXO and accounts models to interact.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Account model

The account model is a blockchain architecture that features direct information and value transfer. Smart contract platforms such as Ethereum use the account model as opposed to the UTXO model used by the Bitcoin network, which limits the capabilities of smart contracts. One potential downside of the account model architecture is difficulty in scaling transactions-per-second.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Account-checker tool

An account-checker is a script or program that takes a list of usernames and passwords — known as a combolist — and tests them against a set of target websites. Account-checker tools substantially increase the speed and efficiency with which an attacker can test a large volume of credentials on a broad range of websites and service providers. These tools are generally used by malicious actors looking to capitalize and commit fraud or identity theft against the account holders from whom they have stolen access.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Acquirer node

On the Crypto.com blockchain network, Acquirer Nodes facilitate the settlement of transactions between merchant and customer. There are two main types of Acquirer Nodes: Customer and Merchant Acquirer Nodes. The two node types communicate to verify merchant verification, perform settlement for users, and provide an escrow service that enables Crypto.com's wallet and debit card products.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Active management

An investing strategy employed by fund managers aiming to outperform an index or market in order to generate profits.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Ad hoc

A phrase of Latin origin that is used in modern English to mean 'for this purpose' or 'specifically for this.'

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Address

A blockchain address is a unique combination of numbers and letters that identifies accounts on a blockchain network. To transact in exchange, digital assets are sent to and from different addresses. An example of a Bitcoin address is ‘14qViLJfdGaP4EeHnDyJbEGQysnCpwk3gd’.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

2

When you send Monero to someone you only need one piece of information, and that is their Monero address. A raw Monero address is a set of 95 characters starting with a 4. The Monero donation address, for instance, is 46BeWrHpwXmHDpDEUmZBWZfoQpdc6HaERCNmx1pEYL2rAcuwufPN9rXHHtyUA4QVy66qeFQkn6sfK8aHYjA3jk3o1Bv16em.

Because those addresses are long and complex you will often encounter an OpenAlias address instead. For example, Monero donations can be sent to donate@getmonero.org or donate.getmonero.org

If you would like to get an OpenAlias address of your own then there is some information on the OpenAlias page.

Source: https://monero.org/monero-glossary/address/

Date Entered:02/13/2021

3

String of text that designates the location of a particular wallet on the blockchain. Often a hashed version of a public key.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered:2/12/2021

4

A Bitcoin address is similar to a physical address or an email. It is the only information you need to provide for someone to pay you with Bitcoin. An important difference, however, is that each address should only be used for a single transaction.

Source: https://bitcoin.org/en/vocabulary#address

Date Entered:2/12/2021

Admin key

An admin key holds special access to make changes to a project's protocol or smart contract. It is typically held by a project's founders or core team. Proponents of decentralization argue that holding admin keys goes against decenralized governance practices and poses security risks, while many projects have stated intention to eliminate them from practice.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Airdrop

The distribution of digital assets to the public, either by virtue of holding a certain other token or simply by virtue of being an active wallet address on a particular blockchain

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

2

An airdrop is a token distribution method in which assets are directly transmitted to user wallets for free. Airdrop recipients do not pay for tokens received. Typically used as a marketing tactic to create awareness around a project, airdrops can also result after a chain fork, token upgrade, or as part of a fundraising mechanism.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Algorithm

A sequence of unambiguous instructions used for the purpose of solving a problem.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Algorithmic stablecoin

Algorithmic stablecoins do not use fiat or cryptocurrency as collateral. Instead, price stability results from the use of algorithms and smart contracts that manage the supply of tokens in circulation. In this model, the stablecoin’s algorithm automatically expands or contracts the number of tokens in circulation in order to meet a specific price target.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Algorithmic trading

Algorithmic trading is a modern method of market trading that utilizes computer software coded to follow a particularly defined set of mathematical instructions — an algorithm — to place one or many trades simultaneously. The formulas compute against price, timing, quantity and other mathematical models to follow specific strategies. Algorithmic trading models execute thousands of trades to generate profits at a speed, frequency, and consistency impossible for a human trader. Algorithmic trading technology gives markets more liquidity and higher profitability, while also potentially eliminating the human emotions and error that can negatively impact trading decisions.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

All or none order (aon)

An order which once placed, must either be filled in its entirety or not at all. This prevents any partial filling of orders

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

All-time high (ath)

The highest price of a cryptocurrency in a quote currency, such as a dollar, BTC, ETH, or BNB

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Allocated gold and unallocated gold

According to the London Good Delivery set of regulatory and compliance standards, gold can be bought in two distinct forms: allocated or unallocated. When a customer purchases allocated gold, they have ownership over the gold and can choose to store it on their own, or in a vault at a London Bullion Market Association (LBMA) facility. Unallocated gold does not feature direct ownership over specific gold bars, but instead holds entitlement to a certain amount of gold.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Allocation

An allotment of tokens or equity, that may be earned, purchased, or set aside for a certain investor, team, group, organization, or other related entity.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Alpha

The first look at a product released by a team, consisting of the very first version of a primitive, basic software or product.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Alpha code

Early-stage prototype computer code, programs, and algorithms meant to solve a problem, and/or provide new digital goods or services. Alpha software comes with the expectation that the code is at an early prototype stage and is meant for an early testing phase meant for very limited testing. Alpha code or software may be missing all or parts of expected software functionality. Planned features and the security of the software may also be very limited or even non-existent in many aspects.

Source: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

Altcoin

An altcoin is an “alternative coin,” or any cryptocurrency launched after Bitcoin. It refers to any cryptocurrency that is not BTC. For example, ETH, XRP, and LTC are all altcoins.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

2

A cryptocurrency that is alternative to Bitcoin. Used to describe cryptocurrencies that are not Bitcoin.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered:2/12/2021

Amortizing

Amortizing refers to the spreading of an initial or overhead cost across time or between parties. On the Orchid network, transaction costs are kept low by amortizing the fees across transactions and users. Transaction fees are slowly paid off or broken into increments that are then shared across a large network to reduce individual user costs.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Amp (amp)

AMP is the digital collateral token of the Flexa network, a payment system that allows users to spend certain cryptocurrencies with select retailers at their brick and mortar locations. AMP is an ERC-20 token used as collateral to guarantee retail payments while blockchain transactions remain unconfirmed. The AMP token is the replacement for Flexacoin (FXC). Gemini Exchange is the first market to support the AMP token.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Andre cronje

Andre Cronje is the founder and lead developer of Yearn Finance. He built most of the original Yearn products, then relinquished personal control of the protocol by launching the YFI governance token in 2020. Cronje remains an active figure and builder in the Yearn community and DeFi ecosystem.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Angel investor

Wealthy investors that seek out opportunities to provide funding for entrepreneurs or start-up companies.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Annual percentage rate (apr)

An annual percentage rate (APR) on a loan is the amount of interest a borrower must pay each year. The APR is expressed as an annual percentage of the outstanding loan balance, and represents the annual cost of borrowing.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Annual percentage yield (apy)

The annual percentage yield (APY) refers to the rate of return earned on a deposit over one year. APY takes into account compounding interest, which is calculated on a periodic basis and added to the balance.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Anti money laundering (aml)

A framework consisting of legal and regulatory procedures to minimize and curb the flow of funds that are generated from illegal or dubious activities.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Anti-malware

Anti-malware is a category of software designed to prevent, detect, and remove malware. Malware refers to any type of 'malicious software' that is specifically designed to cause damage to computers and computer systems. Examples of malware include viruses, trojan horses, and ransomware among others.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Anti-money laundering (aml)

Anti-Money Laundering (AML) is a comprehensive set of processes, regulations, and rules that combat money laundering, terrorism funding, and financial crimes like cyber theft and fraud. AML procedures require financial firms to monitor transactions to ensure that funds are not part of criminal activities, circumventing tax laws, or violating any other regulations. AML is mandatory for users to access financial services in the blockchain industry.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Antivirus

Antivirus is a category of software that is designed to prevent, detect, and remove computer viruses. Computer viruses are malicious computer programs that are designed to replicate themselves and cause damage to computers and computer systems.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Application binary interface (abi)

An application binary interface (ABI) is a standardized method for engaging with smart contracts in a blockchain ecosystem. ABIs allow smart contracts to engage with external data, as well as with other contracts internal to the blockchain platform. ABIs are similar to application programming interfaces (APIs) in that they enable separate software systems to communicate and interact with each other.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Application programming interface (api)

A collection of functions and procedures that allow users to interact/communicate with the data of an application or service, such as an exchange, to execute the features of the service programmatically.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

2

An application programming interface (API) is a set of protocols and codes that determine how different software platforms communicate and share information. APIs define different types of requests and calls that can be made, the data types that can be used, and how to make these requests. It serves as an intermediary between different software systems. A developer can use an API to incorporate features of an external application into their own software. By allowing different platforms to communicate, APIs enhance interoperability across the web.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Application-specific integrated circuit (asic)

An Integrated Circuit customized for maximum performance in a particular use, rather than general-purpose use.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Approved addresses

For a wallet, exchange, or blockchain-based financial services platform, approved addresses refers to the list of addresses permissioned for transactions on an account. Addresses not included on the list are prohibited from certain transactions. Approved addresses are typically implemented for security and compliance reasons.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Arbitrage

Buying and selling of assets over different markets in order to take advantage of differing prices on the same asset.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

2

To arbitrage is to exploit the price difference of an asset or security between two markets for profit. For example, if one bitcoin is selling for $10 on exchange ABC and $12 on exchange XYZ, then an arbitrageur can generate a profit of $2 by purchasing one bitcoin from ABC and selling it at XYZ. Arbitraging can be automated by utilizing sophisticated computer systems and software to monitor prices and conduct high-volume trades that take advantage of even slight differences in prices. Arbitrage is a necessary financial mechanism that keeps prices consistent between different exchanges and wider markets.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Arbitrage

The trading of a coin or crypto derivative, where the price spread between two different markets or exchanges for the same asset or product is utilized to earn greater profits. In DeFi, automated yield farming uses algorithmic arbitrage strategies to maximize returns for investors. These arbitrage strategies may include buying, selling, lending, and/or providing liquidity of one or more digital assets, often in the same day.

Source: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

Artificial intelligence (ai)

Artificial intelligence in a trading context refers to the use of computer software, machine learning, and algorithms to set strategy and execute trades. AI trading systems analyze, process, and calculate vast amounts of data in order to execute optimal investment strategies.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Ask price

The lowest price a seller is willing to accept on their sell order when trading an asset on an exchange.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Asset

An asset is anything of monetary value that can be owned or purchased. Within the context of investing, assets can refer to a variety of financial and physical instruments, from stocks to real estate to gold to dollars. A bitcoin is a particular form of crypto or digital asset.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Asset management

A system or method that helps individuals or companies manage assets. Either on behalf of their clients or their own.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Asymmetric encryption

Asymmetric encryption is a cryptographic system that uses a public key for encryption and a private key for decryption. The public key can be shared with anyone, while the private key is meant to be kept secret to maintain security. Asymmetric encryption is considered more secure than symmetric encryption, which uses one key for both encryption and decryption. The Bitcoin network uses asymmetric encryption.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Asynchronous

Events in electronic systems that do not happen at the same time or speed, or happen independent of the main program flow.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Asynchronous byzantine fault tolerance (abft)

Asynchronous Byzantine Fault Tolerance (aBFT) is the first layer of the Byzantine Fault Tolerance Delegated Proof-of-Stake (BFT-DPoS) consensus mechanism. aBFT uses a two-stage block confirmation mechanism, wherin a two-thirds supermajority of block producers confirm each block twice. The first stage proposes a block (LIB) while the second stage finalizes the proposed LIB to make the block irreversible.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Atomic swap

An atomic swap is a peer-to-peer exchange of crypto assets between two parties without the use of a trusted third party, such as a centralized exchange. Atomic swaps utilize smart contracts to exchange crypto assets between different blockchain networks through a process of locking, verifying, and unlocking.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

2

Smart contract technology that enables the exchange of one cryptocurrency for another without using centralized intermediaries, such as exchanges.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered:2/12/2021

Attack surface

Points in a software environment where an attacker can attempt to enter or extract data from the system.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Auction

A live event where assets or services are negotiated through a bidding process, which is often led by an auctioneer.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

2

a public sale of digital assets to the highest bidder for the purpose of maintaining the stability of the Maker Protocol. The three different types of auctions are Collateral Auction, Debt Auction, and Surplus Auction. An external actor that bids in an Auction is called a Keeper.

Source: https://community-development.makerdao.com/en/faqs/glossary/

Date Entered:02/13/2021

3

An auction is a type of market that allows buyers and sellers to engage with each other through bidding. Auctions have the benefits of elevated liquidity and price discovery.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Audit

An audit is either an internal or independent comprehensive review of a concept, system, process, company, or product. A comprehensive audit includes a thoughtful and in-depth look at the structure, strengths, weaknesses, and vulnerabilities of the thing or process being audited. Audits may be either informal or formal audits and are meant to be a tool to find and analyze weaknesses, so that issues and problems discovered during an audit may be remediated, mitigated, or corrected.

Source: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

Authentication

Authentication is a procedure that verifies the identity of a user before access is granted. To gain access — to an account, platform, private space — the user provides login credentials like passwords, SMS codes, and fingerprints. Authentication generally comes before authorization, which is a verification of a user’s level of access.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Authority masternode (am)

Authority Masternodes (AMs) maintain network consensus and the security of the VeChainThor blockchain. AMs are responsible for block propagation on the platform, and enable VeChainThor's Proof-of-Authority consensus methodology. In order to host an AM, the user must hold 25 million VeChain tokens (VET) and go through a rigorous authentication process. AMs are the most powerful nodes in VeChain's nodal hierarchy, and are very limited in number.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Authorization

Authorization is a procedure that verifies a user’s degree of access. It determines a user’s permission and access to content or resources. Authorization generally comes after successful authentication, or verification of identity.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Automated clearing house (ach)

An automated Clearing House (ACH) is an electronic network that processes financial transactions in the U.S. An ACH payment pulls funds directly from a user’s bank account and deposits them into the recipient's account. A common type of ACH transaction is a direct deposit payment from an employer.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Automated market maker

An Automated Market Maker (AMM) is a decentralized asset trading pool that enables market participants to buy or sell cryptocurrencies. AMMs are non-custodial and permissionless in nature. Most AMMs utilize either a constant product, constant mean, or constant sum market-making formula; however, the most common is a constant product market maker, most notably Uniswap.

Source: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

Automated market maker (amm)

An automated market maker (AMM) is a fully automated decentralized exchange where trades are made against a pool of tokens called a liquidity pool. An algorithm regulates the values and prices of the tokens in the liquidity pool. Since AMMs do not rely on an active market of buyers and sellers, trades can occur at any time. The most popular AMMs are Uniswap, Curve, and Balancer.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Average directional index

The average directional index (ADX) is a technical indicator used to quantify the strength of a trend in a market. The ADX is calculated based on the moving averages of prices, and is epresented by a number ranging from 1 to 100, with a higher number indicating a stronger trend.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

B

Bal token

The Bancor Network Token (BNT) is the default reserve currency that powers the Bancor protocol. The Bancor network is a decentralized exchange platform that uses pools of tokens called liquidity pools to facilitate peer-to-peer trading. Bancor liquidity pools must hold BNT, which acts as the intermediary token for every trade. For example: in order to trade DAI for ETH on Bancor, the protocol first exchanges DAI for BNT, then exchanges BNT for ETH. As liquidity on the Bancor network increases, so does the value of BNT.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bep-2

A technical standard that defines a set of rules for the issuance and management of tokens in the Binance Chain ecosystem.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Bep-20

BEP-20 is a token standard on Binance Smart Chain that extends ERC-20, the most common Ethereum token standard. You can think of it as a blueprint for tokens that defines how they can be spent, who can spend them, and other rules for their usage. Due to its similarity to Binance Chain’s BEP-2 and Ethereum’s ERC-20, it’s compatible with both.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Bip 32

Bitcoin Improvement Proposal 32 (BIP 32) established the standard for hierarchical-deterministic (HD) wallets, a technical improvement over earlier wallets that on random key pairs. BIP 32 allowed for the creation of a hierarchical tree-like wallet structure with more advanced cryptographic security mechanisms. HD wallets are defined by a master key pair at the top of the hierarchy that “determines” all the private key and key pair access codes below it in the access hierarchy.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bip 38 password

A Bitcoin Improvement Proposal 38 (BIP 38) password enables walletholders to encrypt Bitcoin private keys to offer an extra layer of protection. An encrypted private key requires that a user hold both the private key and the password in order to access wallet funds. This makes private key management a critically important step, which is commonly done on paper wallets and other analog devices for security purposes.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bip 39

Bitcoin Improvement Proposal 39 (BIP 39) allows for the generation of a human-readable 12-24 word recovery phrase for hierarchical-deterministic (HD) wallets. With the recovery phrase, users can regenerate an HD wallet that has become lost or damaged. Because they hold such access, BIP39-enabled recovery phrases should be kept secret and stored securely.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bip 44

Bitcoin Improvement Proposal 44 (BIP 44) improves on BIP 32’s HD wallet structure by creating a specific hierarchy that allows for multiple accounts to be held on the same wallet. BIP 44 allowed two or more separate accounts on the same wallet to hold the same cryptocurrencies in different amounts. The separate accounts could be used for different purposes and coexist in a way similar to checking, business, and savings accounts at legacy banks.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bnb

BNB is the native cryptocurrency of the Binance ecosystem and a Top 10 cryptocurrency by market capitalization. On the Binance exchange, users can pay for exchange fees like transactions, withdrawals, and listings in BNB and receive a discounted rate. BNB can also be used to participate in token sales on Binance Launchpad, its platform for hosting third-party Initial Exchange Offerings (IEOs). In September 2020, Binance launched the Binance blockchain, upon which BNB can be staked to verify transactions and recieve block rewards.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

2

Launched by Binance after an initial coin offering that ended on July 3rd, 2017. Used for receiving exchange trading fee discounts among other utilities.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered:2/12/2021

Brd

BRD is a cryptocurrency wallet and financial services platform that aims to accelerate mainstream adoption of cryptocurrencies by simplifying the processes of purchase, conversion, and storage. On BRD's mobile app, users can purchase leading cryptocurrencies, along with BRD tokens (BRD), a native asset that receives rewards and discounts that improve according to a user's BRD holdings.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Btc

BTC is a common unit used to designate one bitcoin.

Source: https://bitcoin.org/en/vocabulary#address

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Buidl

Originally derived from HODL, a term referring to keeping your heads down and focusing on building your product.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Backdoor

A backdoor refers to any method that can circumnavigate regular authentication and authorization procedures to gain root or high-level access to a system, computer, application, or network. Backdoors are commonly installed through remote file inclusion (RFI), which identifies a weak component in an application or a network. This type of channel allows direct control over an infected device to manipulate data, deploy more malware, or create a zombie network of infected computers for criminal activity.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Backtesting

Backtesting is the simulation of a trading strategy based on historical data.Traders use backtesting to prove that their trading system works based on historical results. In trading and investing, past performance does not guarantee future results, which means a strategy that performs well in backtesting may not perform as well going forward.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bags

The portfolio of coins and tokens one is holding. Often related to a poorly performing bag of assets that investors insist to hold.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Baiting

Baiting is a form of social engineering that exploits victims with false promises of financial gain. Malicious actors, bots, or online ads 'bait' victims with quick payouts and riches in exchange, while the process to obtain it involves providing personal information or downloading software infected with malware.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bakers

On the Tezos network, Bakers are nodes with the responsibility of producing new blocks, and are incentivized return to do so with rewards in XTZ. Bakers are Tezos community members who possess a minimum amount of XTZ, and enough hardware and software expertise to run a baking node within the Tezos Proof-of-Stake network. Through a process of token staked delegation, bakers may also produce blocks and earn rewards on behalf of non-Bakers within the Tezos ecosystem.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Baking

Akin to the process of staking in many Proof-of-Stake models, Baking is the process of adding new blocks to the Tezos blockchain. The baking process involves adding, signing, and verifying new blocks, and depositing a specified amount of XTZ as collateral to guarantee honest behavior.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Balance freeze functionality

On the Ripple network, balance freeze is the function through which Ripple gateways freeze or halt transactions in order to prevent any abuse of the system for illicit activity. Balance freeze functionality is a powerful security feature that can only be applied to currencies issued on the Ripple network, and not on the XRP token itself.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Balancer

A Balancer Pool is an automated market maker with certain key properties that cause it to function as a self-balancing weighted portfolio and price sensor. Balancer turns the concept of an index fund on its head: instead of paying fees to portfolio managers to rebalance your portfolio, you collect fees from traders, who rebalance your portfolio by following arbitrage opportunities. Balancer uses a Constant Mean Market Maker (CMMM)that enables non-equal weights for pools (e.g., 80/20 vs. 50/50) and also allows LPs to provide single-sided liquidity.

Source: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

2

Balancer is a non-custodial portfolio manager and automated market maker (AMM) built on Ethereum that pools up to eight different tokens for users to trade. These Balancer pools are self-balancing weighted portfolios with specific parameters. The Balancer protocol allows all Ethereum accounts to add tokens to existing public pools or create their own private pools.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Bandwidth

Bandwidth is the amount of data capacity available for transactional throughput on a network. It is normally measured by the number of megabytes or gigabytes per second. If a network's bandwidth limit is reached, the flow of data will become inadequate to handle the volume, and connections will slow down.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bank for international settlements (bis)

The Bank for International Settlements (BIS) is an international financial institution based in Basel, Switzerland that is owned by numerous global and central banking stakeholders. Its purpose is to guide international monetary policy and administer financial cooperation, alongside serving as a bank for central banks and other international organizations.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Banking as a service (baas)

Banking as a Service (BaaS) is a type of software platform that provides financial services. BaaS provides infrastructure for legacy banking systems to connect and share data with third party financial service providers to create new products. BaaS can be thought of as the ‘middleware’ between legacy financial institutions and fintech startups.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Base currency

A base currency is the currency against which an exchange rate is quoted. It is the first currency referenced in a currency pair. In the BTC/ USD currency pair, which references the price of BTC in terms of USD, the base currency would be BTC and the quoted currency would be USD.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Basic attention token (bat)

The Basic Attention Token (BAT) was created to provide a more effective, fair, and transparent mechanism for connecting and rewarding internet users, advertisers, and publishers. In this digital advertising system, users are rewarded with BATs for their attention, publishers receive BATs based on user attention, and advertisers achieve higher ROI and better targeting. BAT was created by the same team behind the Brave Browser and is integrated into the Brave Browser.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Beacon chain

The Beacon Chain is the first stage of the launch of Ethereum 2.0, an upgrade to the Ethereum network. The Beacon Chain introduces the Proof-of-Stake consensus mechanism to the network and allows ETH holders to stake their ETH and become validators in Ethereum 2.0. The Beacon Chain was designed to be the primary mechanism for coordinating data, users, and assets across the upgraded Ethereum network. It was launched on December 1, 2020.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

2

An Eth2 upgrade that will become the coordinator for the Ethereum network. It introduces proof-of-stake and validators to Ethereum. It will eventually be merged with mainnet.

Source: https://ethereum.org/en/glossary/

Date Entered:2/12/2021

Bear market

A period marked by prevailing negative investor sentiment about an asset or class of assets. A bear market can last weeks, months, or years

Source: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

2

A negative trend in prices of a market. It is widely used not only in the cryptocurrency space but also in the traditional markets.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered:2/12/2021

3

A bear market occurs when the market experiences price declines, typically when prices fall 20% or more from recent highs. A bear market is the opposite of a bull market.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Behavior-based detection methods

Behavior-based detection methods are used by advanced malware protection programs to identify suspicious activity. The protection programs analyze and review code for potentially harmful behavior, networks attacks, and the installation of rootkits and malware.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Benchmark

A measurement standard which can be used to gauge the performance of a particular asset or investment portfolio

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Benchmark indexes

A benchmark index refers to a preeminent index security used as measurie against which to track performance of the wider market. Common benchmark indexes include the S&P 500, Nasdaq Composite, and Russell 3000.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Beta (coefficient)

A tool used to measure the volatility of an asset in comparison to the volatility of a specific portfolio or market index.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Beta (release)

An early version of a program for users to test and for a team to get feedback. Beta stage comes after the Alpha stage.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Beta code

Later stage prototype computer code, programs, and algorithms meant to solve a problem, and/or provide digital goods or services. Beta code comes with the expectation that the code has more functionality and stability as a mid-to-late stage prototype stage with a Beta testing phase, and that the software functionality, features, and security may still be limited. The codebase, process, system, and/or network is often opened up to a limited number of testers who stress test systems and provide feedback for improvements to the developer or development team. Beta code development has the expectation of being one of the critical final phases before the potential public release of Version 1.0 software. Beta software is used with the expectation and understanding that there may still be minor to fatal bugs or security vulnerabilities hidden within this Beta software code or associated processes that may not have been uncovered by previous security reviews, testing, or audits.

Source: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

Bid price

In the context of financial markets, it is the value buyers offer for an asset, such as a commodity, security, or cryptocurrency.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Bid-ask spread

The difference in price between the lowest asking price and highest bid price on the order book for an asset

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

2

A bid-ask spread is the difference between the bid (buy) and ask (sell) price of a particular asset on an exchange. The bid price can be though of as representing demand, while the ask price represents supply. A large bid-ask spread is a sign of poor liquidity in a market.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Binance blockchain charity foundation (bcf)

The world's first decentralized charity platform to advocate the concept of 'blockchain for social good'.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Binance community vote

When the community has the opportunity to vote for their favorite project to win a free listing on Binance.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Binance ecosystem fund (bef)

An initiative by Binance to collaborate with partners who care about the blockchain/cryptocurrency ecosystem.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Binance labs

A social impact fund and an initiative to incubate, invest, and empower blockchain and cryptocurrency entrepreneurs, projects, and communities.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Bit

Bit is a common unit used to designate a sub-unit of a bitcoin - 1,000,000 bits is equal to 1 bitcoin (BTC). This unit is usually more convenient for pricing tips, goods and services.

Source: https://bitcoin.org/en/vocabulary#address

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Bitlicense

The BitLicense is a business license for virtual currency activity that crypto enterprises must obtain before operating in the state of New York. BitLicenses are issued by the New York Department of Financial Services (NYDFS), and primarily regulate the commercial receipt, storage, and transfer of digital assets. Only 25 have been granted as of 2020, while recipients include Circle, Coinbase, Robinhood, and Square. Businesses chartered under New York banking law such as Gemini are not required to hold BitLicenses.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bitcoin

A cryptocurrency created by the pseudonymous developer(s) Satoshi Nakamoto. The first cryptocurrency, initially described as a 'Peer-to-Peer e-cash'.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

2

Bitcoin - with capitalization, is used when describing the concept of Bitcoin, or the entire network itself. e.g. "I was learning about the Bitcoin protocol today." bitcoin - without capitalization, is used to describe bitcoins as a unit of account. e.g. "I sent ten bitcoins today."; it is also often abbreviated BTC or XBT.

Source: https://bitcoin.org/en/vocabulary#address

Date Entered:2/12/2021

3

Bitcoin is a blockchain network with a native cryptocurrency (bitcoin). It is the first blockchain and cryptocurrency, hence its dominant presence within the broader crypto ecosystem. Bitcoin was established in 2009 and pioneered Proof of Work, a technology for reaching consensus on a decentralized network.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Bitcoin cash (bch)

Bitcoin Cash is a hard fork of the Bitcoin Network that serves as an electronic cash payment system. Its cryptocurrency, BCH, was designed to be a more practical cryptocurrency for everyday transactions than BTC. Bitcoin Cash's increased block size encourages use as a payment system rather than as a store of value.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bitcoin core

Leading implementation of the software that enables users to interact with the Bitcoin network. Initially released by Satoshi.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Bitcoin dominance

The ratio of Bitcoin's market capitalization versus the sum of the market capitalizations of all cryptocurrencies.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Bitcoin genesis block

The Bitcoin genesis block was the first block mined on the Bitcoin blockchain. It was mined on January 3, 2009.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bitcoin improvement proposal (bip)

A Bitcoin Improvement Proposal (BIP) is a code change introduced to improve the Bitcoin protocol. A BIP can be submitted by anyone to be evaluated and reviewed. Significant BIPs include BIP 32, BIP 39, and BIP 44.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bitcoin network

The Bitcoin network is a peer-to-peer, decentralized network that allows users to send units of value to each other without any intermediary or bank. The term “Bitcoin” with a capital B denotes the network, while the term "bitcoin" with a lower case B denotes the network's native cryptocurrency.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bitcoin pizza

The first known transaction where Bitcoin was exchanged for a physical good. Laszlo Hanyecz paid 10,000 BTC for two pizzas.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Bitcoiner

A Bitcoiner is holder of bitcoin and an active proponent of the Bitcoin network. Bitcoiners typically believe that bitcoin is the most important and significant digital asset available.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bitcointalk

Bitcointalk is an internet message forum that was launched by pseudonymous Bitcoin creator Satoshi Nakamoto in 2009 to host discussions about Bitcoin, blockchain, and cryptocurrency. It became the meetingpoint for the embryonic blockchain industry, and was the site of the first bitcoin purchase: 10,000 BTC in exchange for two pizzas. Bitcointalk is still in operation today, fostering discussion and community between 450,000+ developers, investors, miners, programmers, and enthusiasts.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Black swan

an unprecedented, unexpected, and catastrophic event that can result in a Collateral asset losing a significant amount of value

Source: https://community-development.makerdao.com/en/faqs/glossary/

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

Black swan event

An event that is often entirely unexpected and deviates from the expected result causing widespread ramifications.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Block

A block is a container of transactions, with a new block being added to the blockchain once every 60 seconds, on average.

Blocks also contain a special type of transaction, the coinbase transaction, which add newly created Monero to the network.

Blocks are created through the process of mining, and the node that successfully mines the block then broadcasts it to each of the nodes connected to it, who subsequently re-broadcast the block until the entire Monero network has received it.

Fake or bad blocks generally cannot be created, as nodes that receive blocks always verify the transactions they contain against a set of consensus rules that all nodes adhere to, including validating the cryptographic signatures on each transaction.

Source: https://monero.org/monero-glossary/block/

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

2

A block is a record in the block chain that contains and confirms many waiting transactions. Roughly every 10 minutes, on average, a new block including transactions is appended to the block chain through mining.

Source: https://bitcoin.org/en/vocabulary#address

Date Entered:2/12/2021

3

On a blockchain, a block is the data record of all transaction information made during a specific timeframe on its network. Blocks are added sequentially to a network's chain of data, which in turn make up the public ledger known as blockchain. For example: A Bitcoin block contains information about the date, time, and amount of transactions, as well as signature information regarding the origin and destination of the transfer. Blocks must be confirmed by the network via a process of consensus before a chain can continue transacting and creating new blocks.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

4

A computer file that stores transaction data. These can then be arranged in a linear sequence, which will form a blockchain.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered:2/12/2021

Block chain

The block chain is a public record of Bitcoin transactions in chronological order. The block chain is shared between all Bitcoin users. It is used to verify the permanence of Bitcoin transactions and to prevent double spending.

Source: https://bitcoin.org/en/vocabulary#address

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Block difficulty

Block difficulty refers to the complexity of computation required to mine new blocks in a Proof-of-Work (PoW) blockchain environment. Block difficulty is a configurable aspect of a blockchain protocol, and can be used as a mechanism to stabilize block production times in accomodating challenges like transaction speeds and network capacity.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Block explorer

An online Blockchain webpage which allows users to browse information about blocks, transactions, balances, and transaction histories.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

2

A block explorer is a software interface that enables users to access realtime blockchain information like transactions, blocks, addresses, nodes, and balances on a particuar network. Operating as web browsers for blockchains, the many free-to-use and open source block explorers are essential in providing for global transparency and democratized access to blockchain network.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Block height

The number of blocks in the chain between itself and the first block on that blockchain (genesis block or block 0).

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Block producers

On most Proof-of-Stake blockchains, block producers are the individuals or group whose hardware is chosen to validate a block's transactions and initiate the next block. The term originated within blockchain ecosystems that utilize Delegated Proof of Stake (DPoS), where users elect block producers to validate and add blocks. Other names for block producers are 'delegates' or 'witnesses.'

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Block reward

The sum of coins awarded by the blockchain protocol to cryptocurrency miners for each successfully mined and validated block.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

2

A block reward is the payment awarded to a blockchain network miner upon successfully validating a new block. Typically paid out in the native asset of its network at a fixed, but regressive rate, block rewards are often the only source of new currency creation on a network. They provide a key element of the incentive structure that keeps blockchain networks operating in a decentralized fashion. In Proof-of-Work blockchains like Bitcoin, block validation and block rewards are the remit of miners. In newer models like Ethereum’s upcoming Proof of Stake, the block reward is paid to the collateral staking validator nodes.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Block size

Blockchain network protocols are made up of blocks of data that are processed in a perpetually updating chain-like structure — hence the term "blockchain." Each block stores transactions sent on the network of a specific size or specific time-period as set by the governance of the particular blockchain.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Block trade

A block trade is a large purchase or sale of securities executed outside of an open marketplace. Because the size of the transactions are quite large, block trading is typically done by institutions and hedge funds. The private nature of block trading makes them similar to over-the-counter (OTC) trading.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Block header

A section in a block containing metadata and a summary of the block's transactions. This is the information hashed when mining

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Blockchain

An immutable permanent public record or ledger of all transactions since the beginning of a cryptocurrency coin or token.

Source: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

2

A decentralized, digitized ledger that records transaction information about a cryptocurrency in a chronological order.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered:2/12/2021

3

Blockchain is a distributed ledger of all transactions both past and present. Unllike other cryptocurrencies, Monero's blockhain doesn't reveal who the funds came from or went to.

Source: https://monero.org/monero-glossary/blockchain/

Date Entered:02/13/2021

4

A blockchain is a public ledger of transactions that is maintained and verified by a decentralized, peer-to-peer network of computers that adhere to a consensus mechanism to confirm data. Each computer in a blockchain network maintains its own copy of the shared record, making it nearly impossible for a single computer to alter any past transactions or for malicious actors to overwhelm the network. Sufficiently decentralized blockchains do not rely on centralized authorities or intermediaries to transact globally, securely, verifiably, and quickly, making technology like cryptocurrency possible.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Blockchain transmission protocol (btp)

The Blockchain Transmission Protocol (BTP) is ICON network’s proprietary interoperability framework. It allows independent blockchain networks to connect and exchange data. BTP facilitates the transfer of information and tokenized assets between ICON and external blockchain systems.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Blockchain trilemma

The blockchain trilemma refers to the challenge in achieving a balance between scalability, decentralization, and security in a blockchain network. While scalability refers to the speed and volume of transactions, decentralization refers to the distribution of network nodes, and security refers to the integrity of the system from compromise. The blockchain trilemma states that an equal prioritization of all three factors at once is impossible — so a trade-off must be made with one. It remains an ambition of blockchain technologists and entrepreneurs to solve for the trilemma with greater effectiveness in the design of any network, update, or application.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bloom filter

A data structure that can be used to inform the user whether a particular item is part of a set

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Bollinger bands

A technical analysis indicator that measures market volatility. It's made of two sidelong bands and a simple moving average.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

2

Bollinger Bands are a technical analysis device created by trader John Bollinger in 1983 that have become one of the most popular tools used by traders today. Bollinger Bands use moving averages and standard deviation to create a range of price movements. On a trading chart, Bollinger Bands are visually represented by a centerline based on a moving average, with a band below and above the centerline based on standard deviation. Bollinger Bands can help indicate if prices have moved outside of the range of historical deviation, and can be used to identify a number of market scenarios in real time.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered:2/13/2021

Botnet

A botnet is a collection of internet-connected devices that have been infected by malware, enabling malicious actors to control the devices. Infected devices are oftentimes controlled remotely and without the legitimate device owner's knowledge. Botnets are often composed of a variety of device types and used by cybercriminals to carry out a broad range of orchestrated online attacks such as credentials leaks, data theft, and DDoS attacks.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bounty

A reward posted by a group or individual to incentivize certain work, behavior (such as referrals), or development.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Brain wallet

A brain wallet refers to a crypto private key or seed phrase that has been memorized by its owner. Although memorized accounts are immune to online hacks and physical theft, they are susceptible to being forgotten, or lost upon the holder’s death. Brain wallets are not recommended as a secure crypto wallet option.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Brave browser

The Brave browser is an open-source, privacy-focused web browser developed by the same team that created the Basic Attention Token (BAT). It is the first web browser to implement the BAT system. The Brave browser, in combination with BAT, rewards users for viewing advertisements in a transparent relationship between advertiser, publisher, and user.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bread rewards

The Bread Rewards program provides incentives to Bread platform users for engaging in network-beneficial activity like maintaining a wallet balance above a certain threshold, or posting on social media. Bread Rewards was one of the first customer loyalty programs in the cryptocurrency wallet space.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Break-even point (bep)

The point where the total costs of an operation is equivalent to its current value or revenue.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Breakdowns

A breakdown is a trading pattern that follows a downward move in an asset’s price, often through an identifiable level of support and further below. Breakdowns are characterized by heavy volume, a rapid decline, and severe magnitude. Breakdowns can be identified by technical indicators like charting patterns, trendlines, and moving averages.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Breakeven multiple

The multiple of the current price by which an asset needs to appreciate in order to reach its previous all-time high.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Breakout

When the price of an asset moves outside of a defined range or pattern, typically by breaking out of a support or resistance area.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Bridges

Bridges allow independent blockchains to communicate with each other. On the Polkadot network, bridges are used to attach parachains and the main Relay Chain to other external blockchain networks such as Bitcoin and Ethereum. Polkadot data transmits from its main Relay Chain to parachains, attached to which collator nodes assemble all the transactions. Collator nodes communicate via a bridge to connect to external blockchain networks.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Brokerage account

A brokerage account is a financial service created and managed by a licensed brokerage firm on behalf of an investor to interact with assets and markets. Account holders can either make trades themselves, or the firm can make them on behalf of account holders. In all cases, the assets purchased through the brokerage account belong to the account holder.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Brute force attack

In a brute force attack, an attacker attempts to gain access to an account by systematically trying all possible combinations of passwords and passphrases that may apply to the account, with the goal of eventually guessing the correct credentials. While brute force attacks can be computationally intensive, time-consuming, and difficult to pull off, they can correctly guess a weak password within a few seconds. A strong password can deter most brute force attacks.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bubble

A bubble occurs when an asset rises to extremely inflated prices and then comes crashing down, settling at a level that’s far less than its original price — typically a drop of 75% or more. It is usually possible to identify a bubble only after it has burst and the price recedes. A speculative bubble is characterized by both the rise and fall occurring within a very short period.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Bull market

A bull market refers to an upward trend in prices for an extended period of time. As of 2020, bitcoin has undergone three bull markets. The opposite of a bull market is a bear market.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

2

A positive trend in prices of a market. It is widely used not only in the cryptocurrency space but also in the traditional markets.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered:2/12/2021

3

A period marked by prevailing positive investor sentiment about an asset or class of assets. A bull market can last weeks, months, or years, and can sometimes be marked by what economists call a Bubble, where there may be irrational overenthusiasm about an asset or class of assets, leading to explosive price growth followed by an explosive price crash.

Source: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

Date Entered:02/13/2021

Bullish

The term "bullish" can be used to describe how positive or optimistic a person feels about a particular asset. Someone who is bullish on bitcoin believes the price of bitcoin will increase. A person who is bullish on bitcoin may also be referred to as a bitcoin "bull."

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Business logic layer (bll)

Within a programming context, the business logic layer (BLL) determines how data a software program interacts with can be created, altered, and stored. The business logic layer coordinates data between the program’s user interface (UI) and data access layer (DAL), although in some programs the UI interacts directly with the DAL.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Buy side/sell side

Buy side and sell side refers to the buyers and sellers in a market who are connected by an order management system (OMS). The buy side is typically fund managers whose job is to pick high-alpha securities for their portfolios. The sell side is typically trading floors at investment banks. Rapid and concurrent trades between the buy side and sell side are facilitated by advanced OMS technology protocols.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Buy wall

A single huge buy order or the composition of multiple large buy orders at the same price in the order book of a particular market.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Byzantine fault tolerance (bft)

Byzantine Fault Tolerance refers to a blockchain network's ability to reach consensus and continue operating even if some of the nodes in the network fail to respond or respond with incorrect information. A network that is Byzantine Fault Tolerant solves the Byzantine Generals Problem, a situation in which all parties must agree but one or more parties are unreliable. Most actively used consensus mechanisms are Byzantine Fault Tolerant.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Byzantine fault tolerance delegated proof of stake (bft-dpos)

Byzantine Fault Tolerance Delegated Proof of Stake (BFT-DPoS) is the primary consensus mechanism that runs the EOS and ICON blockchain ecosystems. BFT-DPoS is a highly-performant consensus mechanism that makes use of data passing between parties without an intermediary. It is composed of the two main layers that work together: Asynchronous Byzantine Fault Tolerance (aBFT) to propagate and validate block production, and Delegated Proof of Stake (DPoS) for block producer voting and scheduling.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Byzantium fork

The first of two hard forks for the Metropolis development stage. It included EIP-649 Metropolis Difficulty Bomb Delay and Block Reward Reduction, where the Ice Age was delayed by 1 year and the block reward was reduced from 5 to 3 ether.

Source: https://ethereum.org/en/glossary/

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

C

C++

C++ is a widely used, general-purpose programming language. An extension of the C programming language, C++ is commonly used as a compiled language (as opposed to an interpreted language) and can be used on many different platforms.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Cex

A CEX is a Centralized Exchange, with a physical address and a corporate structure. Like other CeFi businesses, a CEX must follow all applicable laws, rules, money transmitter licenses, and regulations in each country, state, or region in which they operate. There are significant overhead costs in running a CEX including Corporate leaders, labor, rent and electricity, office supplies, significant legal expenses, and expensive money transmitter licenses to be able to operate in chosen countries, states, or regions.

Source: https://docs.yearn.finance/defi-glossary

Date Entered: 02/13/2021

Comp token

COMP is the governance token of the Compound protocol, a decentralized, blockchain-based protocol that allows you to lend and borrow crypto. A predetermined amount of COMP is distributed to all lenders and borrowers on the Compound protocol every day. Anyone who owns at least 1% of the total COMP supply can submit and vote on proposals to change the protocol.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Cro

CRO is the foundational utility token that drives Crypto.com’s ecosystem of payment, trading, and financial services. The CRO token is utilized for on-chain transaction settlement, and to ensure the consensus and security of the platform. CRO is also designed to be used as an incentivization mechanism by providing rewards for users who engage with various services within the Crypto.com ecosystem.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Crv token

The CRV token is the ERC-20 token that governs the Curve protocol. CRV token holders have the ability to propose and vote on changes to the platform. The CRV token can be earned by providing liquidity to designated Curve liquidity pools.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Call option

A call option contract gives an investor the right, but not the obligation, to purchase an underlying security at a specified price within a defined period of time. When the option expires, the investor can choose to buy the underlying security or let the options contract become void. Call options are traded on exchanges as a derivative, and can be used for speculation, income, or trading strategies like hedging.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Call provision

A call provision on a bond or other fixed-income investment product is an option allowing the issuer to repurchase and retire the bond. The call may be triggered by a set price, or may be limited by a specific time period. A bond with a call provision pays a higher interest rate than a noncallable bond.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Candidate block

A temporary block created by a mining node (miner) to add to the blockchain to receive the block rewards.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Candlestick

A graph representation of price action that displays the open, close, high, and low points within a certain period.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Capitulation

A period of strong selling activity, where investors give up their positions and sell their holdings as quickly as possible.

Source: https://academy.binance.com/en/glossary

Date Entered: 2/12/2021

Cardano (ada)

Cardano is a Proof-of-Stake blockchain platform with smart contract functionality. In particular, Cardano is noted for its focus on academic reserach, high transactions-per-second (TPS) throughput, and an energy-efficient consensus mechanism called Ouroboros. ADA, the native token of the Cardano network, is used to facilitate transactions and smart contract execution.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021

Casascius coins

Casascius Coins were physical bitcoin products sold until 2013. Made of metal, Casascius Coins had a tamper-resistant sticker concealing the private key and could be physically exchanged. The coins came preloaded with fixed amounts of 1, 10, 25, 100, and 1000 bitcoins. Unredeemed versions of Casascius Coins are highly valued on the collector’s market and sell for a large premium.

Source: https://www.gemini.com/cryptopedia/glossary

Date Entered: 2/13/2021